How Good Sleep Affects Your Work & Productivity

Lack of sleep is the biggest performance killer. This article will break down the relationship between good sleep and productivity.

In today’s work culture, where every employer expects a high degree of execution and productivity, lack of sleep is the uppermost performance killer. Most of us are aware (to an extent) that sleep influences productivity. However; this article will break down the details of the relationship between good sleep and the influence it has on work and productivity.

Stumblingly, 34 percent of US workers do not reap enough sleep. Reportedly, sleep deprivation, the major productivity killer, costs $63.2 billion across the United States.

Sleep and Productivity Relation Based Researches

  1. Sleep disruptions induce reduced employee productivity at a high loss to organizations, concluded in a study.
    • More than four thousand employees were distributed in four different groups based on their sleep health. Workers experiencing insomnia or insufficient sleep, at-risk, and the fourth one, having a healthy sleep.
    • It’s not surprising – The lowest productive groups – Insomnia and insufficient sleep suffered workers.
  2. Another study, done by StayWell involved 0.6 million employees from 66 different companies. This study found that improper sleep schedules could cause weakened workplace productivity.
  3. One thousand and seven adults participated in this study as a diverse community sample. The study focused on health and organizational concerns such as anxiety, workload, coworker issues, financial stress, lack of training, job hours, and sleep patterns.

B=1.31, 95%CI[0.05,2.58], p=0.042

Low productivity was directly associated with short sleep, the report concluded.

Sleep disorders diminish the probability of transcending at work. With inefficient sleep, people become more inadequate to concentrate, making decisions, collaborate, and social engagement with co-workers and clients. It severely impacts analytical thinking, problem-solving, and visualization skills.

Besides your impotence to be mentally present and productive at the workspace, sleeplessness doubles your probability of getting ill and absenteeism.

Common Sleep Disorders

Sleep disorders are a typical dilemma for many people. Although it can sometimes be hard to tell if your sleepless nights can be classified as a disorder or just a circumstantial fluke. There are several common “sleep robbers” that steal your sweet dreams away.

  • You may also have insomnia if you keep waking up throughout the night after you have fallen asleep. This lack of rest will lead to drowsiness the next day. Yet when you go to lay your head on the pillow after the day is done, you find that you still cannot sleep.
  • A less well-known disorder is narcolepsy, which involves daytime sleepiness that is excessive and uncontrollable. Narcolepsy goes beyond that occasional tiredness. It can cause “sleep attacks” even in broad daylight when you’re at work or school. You may feel weak and lose control while laughing or experiencing strong emotions. This is as though you’re going to sleep right when you’re emotional.
  • Restless leg syndrome is a disorder that can feel uncontrollable for some people. It leads to urges to move your legs and arms when you’re asleep, keeping you awake even if you’re dead tired.
  • Circadian rhythm disorders are more environmental. Examples include if you are working the late shift, experiencing jet lag, or encountering other circumstances that force you to be awake when you would otherwise be asleep. These factors can lead to trouble falling asleep and staying awake at normal times.
  • Another common disorder is sleep apnea. Sleep apnea occurs when your upper airway passages are blocked, causing you to briefly stop breathing while sleeping. It’s a frightening experience and one that has kept many awake as a result.

Will more sleep help you get productivity? 

Studies proved it. I acknowledge it. 

I’ve accommodated my morning schedule to prove this point.

I began to get up at least one and a half hour before everyone else to start my work early. Though I was trying to be more performance-oriented, I found that I was tired in the middle of the day. This was likely because I had only gotten up too early.

So, I decided to go through an experiment to find out whether more sleep would help me be more organized. 

And I believe that it works.

I’m still practicing to be a morning person.

I get up early and chant a mantra for 15 minutes. I prepare breakfast for my family, get a cup of coffee, and get our little boy up and ready for school.

This grants me an extra hour to check LinkedIn updates, browse my Twitter feed, sending out some emails, and get everything synced without being rushed.

With this on-going daily routine practice, my mind is becoming sharper, and my thought process is more organized. And I’ve told you one change I applied throughout the process; I have not stripped myself of proper sleep. 

The obvious benefits are:

  1. Sleep is a primarily major and usually underutilized ingredient of the brain’s working.

Sleep deprivation provokes anxiety for your brain and slows down the rate of electrical impulses carrying the information and thoughts.

  1. It improves both learning and memory, enabling your brain to catch up with things faster.
  2. Prolonged lack of sleep can also inflate the occasions of having a mood disorder. 

With sleeping disorders like insomnia, you’re more vulnerable to cause depression, anxiety, and chronic illness.

  1. Your mind needs proper sleeping routines to realize and react to the emotions the right way.
  2. You may enhance your social interaction skills and be able to identify colleagues’ emotional expressions.

Final Words…

Various studies have proved that getting a balanced work-life style and quality sleep can help resolve all sorts of physical and mental issues. These issues range from your anxiety, mood swings, communication, and work performance to your workouts.

Superior sleep refers to the succession of both the amount and consistency of sleep schedules.

Proper relaxation sets you up for motivation, creativity, and execution, the most fundamental thing for a professional, like you.

Meet the Author

Michelle is a freelance blogger who’s covered a variety of different topics – Productivity, Health, Entrepreneurship, and Marketing. Before she became a full-time writer, she held various jobs, including tutoring and tele-calling, so she understands how working at home can stress you out.

This post may contain affiliate links which means that if you click the links and make a purchase, I will make a small commission at no extra cost to you. This helps keep the blog running.  See other disclaimers here.

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Mental Health

The quality of your sleep and your mental health are very closely connected. Most people believe that sleep deprivation only affects our physical health. But the fact is that it also severely affects our psychological state and mental health. Studies even show that those suffering from mental health issues are more likely to experience insomnia or other sleep disorders.

Chronic sleep problems affect from 50% to 80% of patients in psychiatric practice. Additionally, chronic sleep problems affect 10% to 18% of adults in the general United States population. Sleep problems are particularly experienced by those who are fighting depression, anxiety, ADHD, and bipolar disorder. In the past, clinicians saw insomnia and other sleep problems as a symptom of mental disease. However, newer studies suggest that sleep problems can directly contribute to the development of some psychiatric disorders. Treating a sleep disorder may help to alleviate some of the symptoms of the co-occurring mental health issue.

The Connection between Sleep and Mental Health

The relationship between our brain and our mental health is not entirely understood, but research shows that a good night’s sleep is vital for mental and emotional resilience. On the other hand, sleep disturbances and sleep deprivation set the stage for negative thinking and emotional vulnerability.

So far, researchers have established a stable connection between sleep problems and mental health, and have proven that sleep disorders affect patients with mental health issues more than people in the general population. Sleep problems increase the risk for developing specific mental diseases, and treating the sleep disorder will significantly help to alleviate the symptoms of the mental health problem.

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Mental Health

How Sleep Affects Mental Health

During sleep, we go through multiple sleep stages. Initially, one sleep cycle lasts around 90 minutes. Every 90 minutes, you will change a sleep cycle, but as sleep progresses, the length of time spend in each sleep stage will vary.

During non-REM sleep, also known as “quiet” sleep, you will go through four different stages of deep sleep. Your body temperature will drop, your muscles will relax, and your breathing and heart rate will slow down. Deep sleep nourishes your physical health, such as helping to boost your immune system functioning.

REM sleep also known as rapid eye movement is a sleep stage when people dream. Your blood pressure, heart rate, breathing, and body temperature levels are very similar to when you are awake. REM sleep contributes to emotional health and enhances learning and memory.

Scientists have discovered that sleep deprivation affects levels of neurotransmitters and stress hormones which may wreak havoc in the brain, impair your thinking and emotional regulation. In this way, sleep disorders may intensify the symptoms of mental health issues such as depression and anxiety, bipolar disorder, and ADHD.

Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Mental Health

Psychological Effects of Sleep Deprivation

Sleep is vital for optimal mental health. During sleep, the brain processes information and consolidates memories learned and experienced during the day.

Chronic sleep deprivation can inhibit productivity, slow down your thought processes, suppress creativity, increase irritability, impair concentration and coordination, and make learning very difficult.

Sleep deprived individuals are more likely to anger, become aggressive or depressed and they have more difficulties handling stress.

Chronic sleep deprivation can even induce hallucinations and trigger mania. However, mania is triggered only in individuals who are suffering from bipolar disorder.

Lack of sleep has similar mental effects as drinking – it impairs judgments, distorts thinking and slows down reaction time. As you can see, without a good night’s rest, it is impossible to function optimally during the day and successfully complete your daily activities.

Practical Tips to Sleep Better

1. Figure out your sleep efficacy

To determine you sleep efficacy, divide the number of hours slept by the number of hours spent in bed, and then multiply it by 100. A good sleep efficacy number is around 85. This number reveals if you're giving your body enough time to relax and unwind at night or if you're spending too much time in bed doing other things, like watching movies or reading.

2. Set good sleep behaviors

Having a consistent bed routine isn’t only beneficial to children, but to adults as well. The first step of improving your sleep is to try to go to bed and wake up at the same times each day. This helps your body set a regular rhythm and ensure you wake up refreshed every morning.

3. Get help if you need it

If you have troubles falling asleep at night for an extended period, don’t turn to OTC medication. Over-the-counter products can be used for occasional sleeplessness, but mustn’t be used on a daily basis. If you struggle to fall asleep at night, never hesitate to see your family doctor or visit a sleep clinic.

Meet the Author

This post was written by Andrew Levacy. Andrew runs Memory Foam Talk, a site dedicated to unbiased mattress reviews. As someone fighting insomnia for years, his mission is to help people get a better night’s rest by facilitating the often long and painful decision of selecting a new mattress.