How Good Sleep Affects Your Work & Productivity

Lack of sleep is the biggest performance killer. This article will break down the relationship between good sleep and productivity.

In today’s work culture, where every employer expects a high degree of execution and productivity, lack of sleep is the uppermost performance killer. Most of us are aware (to an extent) that sleep influences productivity. However; this article will break down the details of the relationship between good sleep and the influence it has on work and productivity.

Stumblingly, 34 percent of US workers do not reap enough sleep. Reportedly, sleep deprivation, the major productivity killer, costs $63.2 billion across the United States.

Sleep and Productivity Relation Based Researches

  1. Sleep disruptions induce reduced employee productivity at a high loss to organizations, concluded in a study.
    • More than four thousand employees were distributed in four different groups based on their sleep health. Workers experiencing insomnia or insufficient sleep, at-risk, and the fourth one, having a healthy sleep.
    • It’s not surprising – The lowest productive groups – Insomnia and insufficient sleep suffered workers.
  2. Another study, done by StayWell involved 0.6 million employees from 66 different companies. This study found that improper sleep schedules could cause weakened workplace productivity.
  3. One thousand and seven adults participated in this study as a diverse community sample. The study focused on health and organizational concerns such as anxiety, workload, coworker issues, financial stress, lack of training, job hours, and sleep patterns.

B=1.31, 95%CI[0.05,2.58], p=0.042

Low productivity was directly associated with short sleep, the report concluded.

Sleep disorders diminish the probability of transcending at work. With inefficient sleep, people become more inadequate to concentrate, making decisions, collaborate, and social engagement with co-workers and clients. It severely impacts analytical thinking, problem-solving, and visualization skills.

Besides your impotence to be mentally present and productive at the workspace, sleeplessness doubles your probability of getting ill and absenteeism.

Common Sleep Disorders

Sleep disorders are a typical dilemma for many people. Although it can sometimes be hard to tell if your sleepless nights can be classified as a disorder or just a circumstantial fluke. There are several common “sleep robbers” that steal your sweet dreams away.

  • You may also have insomnia if you keep waking up throughout the night after you have fallen asleep. This lack of rest will lead to drowsiness the next day. Yet when you go to lay your head on the pillow after the day is done, you find that you still cannot sleep.
  • A less well-known disorder is narcolepsy, which involves daytime sleepiness that is excessive and uncontrollable. Narcolepsy goes beyond that occasional tiredness. It can cause “sleep attacks” even in broad daylight when you’re at work or school. You may feel weak and lose control while laughing or experiencing strong emotions. This is as though you’re going to sleep right when you’re emotional.
  • Restless leg syndrome is a disorder that can feel uncontrollable for some people. It leads to urges to move your legs and arms when you’re asleep, keeping you awake even if you’re dead tired.
  • Circadian rhythm disorders are more environmental. Examples include if you are working the late shift, experiencing jet lag, or encountering other circumstances that force you to be awake when you would otherwise be asleep. These factors can lead to trouble falling asleep and staying awake at normal times.
  • Another common disorder is sleep apnea. Sleep apnea occurs when your upper airway passages are blocked, causing you to briefly stop breathing while sleeping. It’s a frightening experience and one that has kept many awake as a result.

Will more sleep help you get productivity? 

Studies proved it. I acknowledge it. 

I’ve accommodated my morning schedule to prove this point.

I began to get up at least one and a half hour before everyone else to start my work early. Though I was trying to be more performance-oriented, I found that I was tired in the middle of the day. This was likely because I had only gotten up too early.

So, I decided to go through an experiment to find out whether more sleep would help me be more organized. 

And I believe that it works.

I’m still practicing to be a morning person.

I get up early and chant a mantra for 15 minutes. I prepare breakfast for my family, get a cup of coffee, and get our little boy up and ready for school.

This grants me an extra hour to check LinkedIn updates, browse my Twitter feed, sending out some emails, and get everything synced without being rushed.

With this on-going daily routine practice, my mind is becoming sharper, and my thought process is more organized. And I’ve told you one change I applied throughout the process; I have not stripped myself of proper sleep. 

The obvious benefits are:

  1. Sleep is a primarily major and usually underutilized ingredient of the brain’s working.

Sleep deprivation provokes anxiety for your brain and slows down the rate of electrical impulses carrying the information and thoughts.

  1. It improves both learning and memory, enabling your brain to catch up with things faster.
  2. Prolonged lack of sleep can also inflate the occasions of having a mood disorder. 

With sleeping disorders like insomnia, you’re more vulnerable to cause depression, anxiety, and chronic illness.

  1. Your mind needs proper sleeping routines to realize and react to the emotions the right way.
  2. You may enhance your social interaction skills and be able to identify colleagues’ emotional expressions.

Final Words…

Various studies have proved that getting a balanced work-life style and quality sleep can help resolve all sorts of physical and mental issues. These issues range from your anxiety, mood swings, communication, and work performance to your workouts.

Superior sleep refers to the succession of both the amount and consistency of sleep schedules.

Proper relaxation sets you up for motivation, creativity, and execution, the most fundamental thing for a professional, like you.

Meet the Author

Michelle is a freelance blogger who’s covered a variety of different topics – Productivity, Health, Entrepreneurship, and Marketing. Before she became a full-time writer, she held various jobs, including tutoring and tele-calling, so she understands how working at home can stress you out.

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